The Spiritual Works of Mercy: TOB Style

According to the Catholic encyclopedia, mercy is “a virtue influencing one’s will to have compassion for, and, if possible, to alleviate another’s misfortune.”  The spiritual works of mercy are one way Catholics can show charity and compassion to others. Since my husband and I are trained in the Theology of the Body (TOB) and teach Natural Family Planning, we have always tried to practice the spiritual works of mercy through our NFP ministry.

Many Catholics do not understand the Church’s teachings on sexuality. Mother Teresa once said, “If you judge someone, you have no time to love them.” Sharing the truth with charity and without judgment is extremely important.

Admonish the Sinner and Instruct the Ignorant 

I often find myself in conversations about these intimate topics with acquaintances and relatives. For example, while I was attending a First Penance meeting with one of my sons, the instructor handed out a “Examination of Conscience” pamphlet.

On page three, under “Thou Shall Not Kill,” sterilization was listed correctly as a mortal sin.  The woman next to me gasped and whispered, “I thought the Church changed her teaching on this.  I had my tubes tied and didn’t know it was wrong.”

I then gently said, “The Church has never changed this teaching.  Birth control and sterilization have always been considered mortal sins.”  The woman glanced away, then turned back to me, tears in her eyes. I patted her shoulder, then said,  “You know, if you didn’t realize it was wrong, then it’s not a mortal sin.”

I pointed out the section in the “Examination of Conscience” pamphlet which stated that all three of these conditions need to be in place for mortal sin: it must be 1) serious matter, 2) the person must know it is serious and then 3) freely commit it.  I strongly encouraged her to seek spiritual direction from a faithful priest.  When she left the meeting, she thanked me.

Counsel the Doubtful and Comfort the Sorrowful

A few years ago, when we were speaking at the local marriage prep course on “Sexual Honesty Within Marriage,” we talked about the importance of keeping the marital embrace free, total, faithful, and “fruitful.”

During the last part of the talk, we explained that contraception removes the fruitful aspect from the marital act. All of a sudden, a young woman rushed out of the meeting room, in tears.  James and I continued our talk while one of the other host couples followed her, but we were concerned.

After the talk, I immediately went to speak to the woman. I learned that she was the mother of a 13-year-old daughter from a teenage relationship.  The young woman shared that she was currently in remission from terminal cancer.  Because of the aggressive treatment, her doctors told that she would not have any more children.

She told me that it upset her to hear the suggestion that her marriage might not be “fruitful” since she and her fiancé would never have children. (Of course, we didn’t say that in our talk, but this is how she interpreted it). She admitted that she had mistakenly thought she had already dealt with the fact that she and her future husband would not be having children together. But our talk seemed to bring her sadness and regret to the surface. She then sobbed and I embraced her as she released emotions that had obviously been pent up for a while.

When she stopped crying, I explained that fruitfulness was much more than giving birth to children.  We discussed adoption. We talked about the fruitfulness of being a good example as well as other ways she and her husband could be ‘fruitful” in their marriage. After the course finished that evening, she came up to me, hugged me and thanked me for being so “kind.”

Bear Wrongs Patiently, Forgive all Injuries

Bearing wrongs patiently has never been something I have done well.  And the following example shows that not everyone I “admonish” or “instruct” has been open to the information.

Ten years ago, a woman called for NFP counseling.  She and her husband had taken an NFP class years earlier. Her husband, she said, had made an appointment for a vasectomy and he had indicated the decision was not up for debate.

After using NFP for many years, he no longer had any patience for the abstinence it entailed.  The wife sounded like she was crying. “What can I do to stop him?”

I spoke with her, then sent her information on the moral, spiritual, and physical implications of sterilization. I encouraged her to seek spiritual direction from a faithful priest I knew in the area. Four different times we spoke on the phone, her tone frantic and desperate. Finally, she stopped calling.

I continued to pray for this couple. Some months later, she called to inform me that her husband had indeed gone through with the vasectomy and they were now ‘very happy.’   She wanted me to know that, although she knew I didn’t agree with ‘their’ decision, she had come to accept it and that it had been the ‘right’ thing for them.

Admittedly, I have no idea what happened in between her frantic calls and the vasectomy. I suspect she never called the faithful priest I recommended.  However, I calmly responded, “But sterilization is against the fifth commandment as well as the sixth, it separates a couple…it causes an increase in prostate cancer, it – ”

She cut me off by angrily telling me that she only called to inform me, not to hear what the Church teaches, that she already knew that.  Her husband then got on the phone and yelled at me, his tone sharp, accusing me of trying to “sabotage” his marriage.

I listened, heart pounding, as he screamed at me over the phone. It took a lot of self-control not to hang up nor respond to his verbal abuse.  I prayed and waited until he stopped yelling, although by that point, I was nearly in tears and my hands were trembling.  Then I said, my voice breaking,  “I will pray for you and I wish you both well…goodbye.” My hands shaking, I hung up the phone and cried.    I forgave them long ago for their verbal abuse, and I have prayed for them from time to time, but I’ve always wondered how they are doing.

Pray for the Living and the Dead

Prayer is so powerful, more powerful than any of us can ever imagine. Even if you’re not comfortable speaking up, you can always pray for anyone at anytime. Praying for others is an important part of the spiritual works of mercy.

I pray daily that more couples can discover the joy of following the Church’s teachings on sexuality by learning NFP: to be chaste before marriage, to be generous and open to life within marriage. I pray for all the student couples to whom we have taught NFP over the years.  I pray for the engaged couples who have listened to our testimony and talks at marriage prep courses. I offer up many prayers for relatives and friends who have chosen to lead alternate lifestyles, and those deceased ancestors and relatives who were not faithful to the Catholic Church’s beautiful teachings of sexuality.

Practicing the spiritual works of mercy through the Theology of the Body is an ideal way to show charity and compassion to others.  It’s not always easy to do. However, I know that, for me, it is the right thing to do, even if the person or persons are not open to the message.  The truth is, we never know when a seed of truth will be planted and someone will experience a change of heart.

Copyright 2014 Ellen Gable Hrkach

Photo: The author praying at St. Richard’s Church in Philadelphia.  Photo credit: James Hrkach (2013)

2 Comments
  1. February 20, 2014 | Reply
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