STYLE Savvy: Planner Meets Reality (or, What Not to Do)

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When Barb proposed this planner link-up idea to me, I was really excited about it. How cool! A peek into other people’s planners! I love planners! How much fun will this be??

The good: the master calendar that allegedly has everyone's "stuff" on it. I reprint and repost it when the handwritten additions become too plentiful.

The good: the master calendar that allegedly has everyone’s “stuff” on it. I reprint and repost it when the handwritten additions become too plentiful.

Tons!

Until I actually thought about posting my own calendar, warts and all. And since last week was two parts snow day, three parts recovery/transition into a new semester, there were plenty of warts.

And then I remembered. I’ve never pulled any punches here, and I’ve tried to make it clear from the outset that I got interested in this topic because I have to work at staying organized, and because traditional tools and methods don’t always work for me.

So this post is the unvarnished truth, featuring a working (and sometimes non-working) planner — a constant work-in-progress. It’s flawed, it’s messy and it works great when I do it right, which I sometimes don’t.

Welcome to the real world.

 

The bad: Apparently I was so overwhelmed by the time Friday rolled around that I didn't write a thing down. Don't try this at home.

The bad: Apparently I was so overwhelmed by the time Friday rolled around that I didn’t write a thing down. Don’t try this at home.

The ugly: Sometimes, my poor notepad calendar is simply a glorified to-do list with the date at the top. This happens often on the weekends.

The ugly: Sometimes, my poor notepad calendar is simply a glorified to-do list with the date at the top. This happens often on the weekends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How it's supposed to work: Appointments on the left, to-do list on the right. Those papers stuck between the pages? Bills to be paid that day.

How it’s supposed to work: Appointments on the left, to-do list on the right. Those papers stuck between the pages? Bills to be paid that day.

 

Your turn: show us YOUR planner! If you don’t have a blog, tell us about it in the comments.

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Copyright 2016 Lisa Hess

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About Author

Lisa Lawmaster Hess has contributed articles to local, national and online publications, and is a blogger at The Porch Swing Chronicles, The Susquehanna Writers and here at Catholicmom.com. She is the author of two non-fiction books (Acting Assertively and Diverse Divorce) and two novels, Casting the First Stone and Chasing a Second Chance. A retired elementary school counselor, Lisa is a lecturer in psychology at York College and enjoys singing with the contemporary choir at her church.

5 Comments

  1. I forgot about the kitchen-fridge calendar! That’s really just for me; nobody else ever bothers to mark anything on it. But I can tell the rest of the family to go check that calendar to find out when things are happening.

    • I subject my family to a weekly calendar review/update at dinner on Friday. Otherwise, the only stuff on the calendar is my stuff!

      ***Barb’s too modest to say anything, but If you haven’t checked out her planner post at franciscanmom.com, you really should. It’s impressive. 🙂

      • ::blushes::
        Yes, I do enable the rest of the family (now at home, just Hubs and 13-year-old) by being the only one who bothers to write on the calendar. I think I really just have it there so that I can tell them, when they claim they “didn’t know” something was scheduled, that it was ON THE CALENDAR.
        Plus, I have neater handwriting than either of them. Haha!

  2. You’ve struck on a topic I love… but I still am planner challenged. I’ve gone almost exclusively to using Google Calendar and its tasks list as my planner, but I still LOVE the feel of a paper planner. In a different world, where I sat at the same desk every day (or even in the same city) maybe that would work. For now, I need a solution that will easily go with me. Great post!

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