Daily Readings Reflection for 12/03/10

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Reflection on Today’s Daily Readings by Fr. Bertrand Buby, SM

Today’s Readings

Scripture: Lectionary # 180. Isaiah 29:17-24. Psalm 27:1.4.13-14.
Matthew 9:27-31:

What a wonderful gift is our sight. Even in reading about the curing of
the blind in Isaiah and then Jesus giving sight to the two blind men who
grope their way toward him on the road to Capernaum, we are amazed and
startled by such miracles. John has Jesus speaking about blindness when he
cures another person who was blind from birth: His disciples asked him,
“Rabbi, was it his sin or that of his parents that caused him to be born
blind?” “Neither,” answered Jesus: “It was no sin, either of this man or
his parents. Rather, it was to let God’s works show forth in him. We must
do the deeds of him who sent me while it is day. The night comes on when no
one can work. While I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” (John
9:2b-5).

Our reading from Isaiah has the following consoling message, “And out of
gloom and darkness the blind shall see.” Then the selection for the day has
Jesus healing both men who cried out with great and courageous faith,
“Jesus, Son of David, have pity on us.” What a marvelous experience they
had in seeing the face of the Son of God and then the beauty of all that
surrounded them on both sides of the road.

Psalm 27 is also about the light in which we see and it extols this gift of
God given freely to us. “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom
should I fear?” The psalm comes back several times to the act of seeing.
“This I seek: to dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life,
that I may gaze on the loveliness of the Lord all the days of my life. Show
me, O Lord, your way, and lead me to a level path. I believe that I shall
see the bounty of the Lord in the land of the living.” Yes, God and
Jesus are our light and our salvation whom should we fear?

Perhaps, blindness can be applied to the spiritual realm as well. Many
people returning from Lourdes, Fatima, or other shrines for healing, say
they were not physically healed but spiritually. That means they see
things in a new way that gets them out of the old patterns that blocked
their vision of Jesus and the saints. Now they are on pilgrimage with the
people of God toward the city of God, the new Jerusalem coming down from
heaven. All of us need to wait for the healing power of the Lord with
courage, patience, and faith.We are to be stouthearted while waiting for
the Lord. We are led to pray for those who also are eye
specialists–opthamologists, oculists, medical doctors. We pray also for
the spiritual persons who help us see better by looking at the bigger
picture: mentors, confessors, counselors, spiritual directors and novice
masters. Jesus, we are confident that you can help us to see beyond our
own biases, addictions, sins, and spiritual blindness. Lord, Jesus, Son of
David, have pity on us! Restore our sight. Amen.

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