CatholicMom.com Image Resources

Best practices for image attribution and formatting

Welcome to our image attribution guide! We want to be sure that our contributors are adding proper citation to all images that we use on CatholicMom.com. Please use this FAQ for reference as you place attributions for the images you use.

This guide will also help you if you have questions regarding formatting and sizing your images.

If you have more questions after consulting this guide, email us at [email protected]

Take me right to the list of image sources!

We’ve revised our image-submission process to make it easier for everyone.
  • email Barb at [email protected] when you’re ready to submit your post
  • attach the image ONLY if it is yours or if you have resized or otherwise modified it, and indicate the source–or that it’s yours–in the email
  • include the link to the image if you sourced it elsewhere
  • if you used more than one image, please indicate in your post where you want those images to go
  • please do not embed the photos from the source site or drop photo links into your post. Send them in an email.
  • featured images MUST measure 720 pixels wide x 340 high or be something that can be cropped to that size
Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words. Great featured images (720 wide by 340 high) will catch the reader’s eye and get them to click through to read your article. 
Things to remember about featured images:

Here’s the FAQ:

Why do I need to provide attribution for images I use in my posts?
Where can I get images that are OK to use in my posts?
Where can I get images of the Pope’s visit to the USA to use in my posts?
If an image site has the note ‘no attribution required’ do I still need to provide attribution?
What information must be included in my image attribution?
What do I do if the source site does not include complete source information for the image?
Where do I place the image attribution information in my post?
What images can I use from the CatholicMom.com image library?
What images need to be credited?
What images do not need to be credited?
What will happen if I do not provide attribution for images I use in my posts?
How do I get attribution information for photos or art from the major image-sourcing websites?

Can I add other images into my post besides the featured image?

How do I…

Why do I need to…

__________________________

Why do I need to provide attribution for images I use in my posts?

Plain and simple: if you don’t, you’re stealing. Using images that are not your own without attribution is the same as plagiarizing quotes from books. And just because an image is on a site labeled “royalty-free,” that doesn’t mean you don’t have to include an attribution line.

Using photos and images without attribution opens up lawsuit opportunities for the photographer, artist or copyright holder. We don’t want to expose Lisa to any lawsuits! This is a very real concern, and we need to be careful about it.

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Google’s image-search tool is not the best way to go. The process of searching by usage rights is cumbersome, and finding attribution information can be difficult. Fortunately, there are quite a few free image-hosting sites that make it easy to provide proper attribution for images you use. We have checked each of the sites in this list to be sure they are above-board in providing images for use online:

Whatever image source you use, please be sure to verify that each image you select has copyright information that permits it to be used free of charge, and include copyright information (at the very least, a link directly to the image) with every image you use.

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Where can I get images of the Pope’s visit to the USA to use in my posts?

You are welcome to use photos of the Pope’s visit to the USA from Aleteia.org. This website has generously offered the use of all photos of the papal visit. Attribution is required. Please use the following attribution for these photos:

Copyright 2015 Aleteia.org. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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If an image site has the note ‘no attribution required’ do I still need to provide attribution?

Yes. We have no way to tell, on the back end, that you used a “no attribution required” photo. Please provide the same attribution regardless of such a notation on the image site.

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What information must be included in my image attribution?

Unless the image is your own, you must include the following:

Title of work, author of work, date, source website, licensing information (if available).

It is not enough to just add the line:

Image via Pixabay

to a post. Fortunately, most of the major sources for free images make it fairly easy to give correct attribution. Some sites give you everything you need, all wrapped up in a handy-dandy link. Click here to learn how to work with these links.

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What do I do if the source site does not include complete source information for the image?

This often happens on sites like Flickr, where some lazy photographers will upload an entire memory card to the site without bothering to give titles for any photo. (In the screenshot below, that series of numbers: 100_4557.JPG, is a dead giveaway that this is what was done. That’s no title; it’s a memory-card filename.)

Give whatever information you can find. If all you can get is a username, a date, and source website, then that’s what you include. Also include the direct link to the image.

screenshot MORGUEFILE showing very little to go on

Screenshot from Morguefile showing very minimal information. Do the best you can with what you have.

For this photo, attribute as follows:

Photo by VirgoSixtyone (2015) via Morguefile.

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Where do I place the image attribution information in my post?

Ideally, the best place for the image attribution is in the image caption. Click here to learn how to add a caption to your image.

You may instead place the attribution at the very bottom of the post, just below “Copyright (year) (Your Name).”

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What images can I use from the CatholicMom.com image library?

Logos, product images and your own photos from your previous posts. Nothing else. Our image library is in the process of being cleaned out. Please use other sources for images for your posts. There are many sources, including some that do all the work of attribution FOR you–all you’ll need to do is copy and paste! Click here for a list of several sources for good-quality royalty-free images.

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What images need to be credited?

Almost every image you use. Exceptions are listed here.

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What images do not need to be credited?

  • Logos from the CatholicMom.com library
  • Book covers, CD covers, and other product images being used in a review or evaluation post.

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What will happen if I do not provide attribution for images I use in my posts?

We’ll contact you to ask you where you got the image. If we don’t hear back quickly enough to get the attribution included before the post goes live, we’ll remove the image or the post will run late.

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How do I credit a photo I took myself?

Add this line at the bottom of the post and in the caption:

Photo copyright (year) (Your Name). All rights reserved.

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How do I credit a photo someone else shared with me?

Add this line at the bottom of the post and in the caption:

Photo copyright (year) (Name of Photographer). Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Alternatively, you can use this format:

Photo courtesy of (Name of Photographer). All rights reserved.

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How do I get attribution information for photos or art from the major image-sourcing websites?

  • Wikimedia Commons will generate an automatic attribution for you to use! To get it, click on the “More details” button on the bottom right of an image after you choose it from your search result. Then, click the “Use this file” link pictured below:Screenshot WIKIMEDIA showing how to get attribution info
    You will get a popup window with an automatic link and automatic attribution information. Check the box labeled “HTML” and you’ll get code you can enter into your caption and your attribution (using the TEXT editor). Screenshot WIKIMEDIA use this file on the webFor this photo, attribute as follows using the TEXT editor:

    By Pemba.mpimaji (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

  • Flickr: Click the “share” arrow on each image to access the attribution tool. You’ll find it all the way to the right, beneath the image: screenshot FLICKR where to find artist title date DL button share button
    Screenshot FLICKR showing SHORTLINK

    Crucifixion by Dennis Jarvis (2014) via Flickr, CC.

    Crucifixion by Dennis Jarvis (2014) via Flickr, CC.

    For this photo, attribute as follows:

    Crucifixion by Dennis Jarvis (2014) via Flickr, CC.

  • Pixabay: when you search on this site, there are both sponsored images and free images. Be careful to use the free images (sponsored images are clearly noted as such.) Pixabay uses image tags rather than titles, so you won’t have a title for any image you use. Include as much other information as you can find. Sometimes you can click on the Pixabay username for the photographer’s real name.
    Photo by Karsten Paulick (2014) via , CC0 Public Domain.

    Photo by Karsten Paulick (2014) via Pixabay, CC0 Public Domain.

    For this photo, attribute as follows:

    Photo by Karsten Paulick (2014) via Pixabay, CC0 Public Domain.

  • Freeimages.com: this site also offers sponsored images as well as free ones. Be sure to use the free images (separated by a horizontal line). Click the username to get the photographer’s real name, if available. This site provides image titles, dates and licensing information.
    Cross in the Woods, Perspective 2 by pheonix1 (2011) via Freeimages.com.

    Cross in the Woods, Perspective 2 by pheonix1 (2011) via Freeimages.com.

    For this photo, attribute as follows:

    Cross in the Woods, Perspective 2 by pheonix1 (2011) via Freeimages.com.

  • Getty Open Content Photos have a specific format for attribution. If you use one of their images, you need to include this line after the title, author and date (all of which you will find right next to each image in your search result).

    Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.

    Not all of Getty’s photos are in the Open Content program. Please do NOT use the Getty Embed feature. We explain why images may not be embedded on our site here. Also, it is a violation of Getty’s Terms of Service to use the photos in their Embed program without embedding them. Photos from Getty must be either from the Open Content Program or licensed (paid) by the post author or we will remove those photos.

  • There are many other free image-sourcing websites which you may certainly use as long as you provide proper attribution for any images:  Title, Author, Date, Source, License.

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How do I use the HTML code sites provide for attribution?

  1. Go into the TEXT editor of your posting window:CM text view 2
  2. Scroll down to the bottom of the post. If you’re unfamiliar with HTML, it’s going to look like a whole bunch of crazy stuff. Don’t worry about all that, and don’t delete anything!
  3. Paste the HTML code into the very bottom, just after the Copyright (year) (your name) line.
  4. Return to the VISUAL view of your posting window to continue working on your post.

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How do I generate attribution code from sources that don’t provide that functionality?

There’s a free browser addon that will do the work of writing an attribution for you! OpenAttribute is available for Chrome, Firefox, Opera and more and places a tiny icon in your browser’s address bar. Clicking on this icon brings up a window with attribution information. Click “More Information” in the box, then copy the code you see in the box labeled “Basic Attribution” into your caption and footer.

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How do I add attribution information into the image caption?

Screenshot Caption Box locationRight-click on the image to edit it, then click on the pencil icon that appears.

Type your information into the box labeled CAPTION. Then click “insert into post.”

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How do I add HTML code into an image caption?

Screenshot Caption box including HTMLWhen using images from sites that provide ready-made HTML attribution code, you can add that straight into the caption.

Right-click on the image to edit it, then click on the pencil icon that appears.

Copy and paste the HTML attribution code into the box labeled CAPTION.

You can also build your own HTML code in the caption box. For example, if you want to credit a photo from Morguefile and have the direct link to the photo, you can build a link as follows:

Title, Author (date) via <a href=”direct link to photo goes here”>source of photo goes here (Morguefile, for this example)</a>

This will automatically convert into a clickable link right there in the caption once you click “insert into post.”

You can also insert links into captions after the caption is written, by highlighting the text to be linked, then using the link tool just as you would in your post. This is demonstrated in Lisa’s video, which you can view here.

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How do I modify or add text to an image?

There are many free image-editing resources. Here are some that we have used:

  • Canva
  • Piktochart 
  • BeFunky
  • Photoshop Express Editor
  • Splashup
  • PicMonkey
  • Pixlr
  • Pixenate
  • Lunapic
  • Sumo Paint
  • Pablo by Buffer
  • Ribbet
  • Quozio is a free design site using quotes you provide and adding backgrounds from several choices available at the site. This site requires an email address to join. Begin by adding your quote. You’ll need to type something in the “who said it” box, even if you just put the cursor into the box and hit the spacebar. Then click “GO” and your quote will be presented on a randomly-chosen background. Change the background if you choose, then right-click to save your image to your computer. You do not get to choose the font or text color, but the process couldn’t be simpler.

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How do I credit a photo or image I have modified in some way?

If you modify an image in any way or add text to it, you still need to add a proper citation. After including your other citation information, add this line:

Image modified by (Your Name).

or

Text added by (Your Name).

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How do I choose where my image will be located in a post?

CM photo alignment

With our current template, photos look better either centered or left-justified. To left-justify and image, click on “Alignment LEFT” when you are adding the photo–you’ll see that in the right column, below the caption area. You’ll probably need to scroll down a bit to do this. If you forget to align your photo while adding it, right-click on the photo and a little box will pop up on top. Choose the first option, that shows the photo to the LEFT of the text. (The options, left to right, are Align Left, Center, Align Right, No Alignment, Edit photo and Delete photo.) In the EDIT photo screen you can add a caption with your photo attribution.

The image size for our Featured Image is 720 wide by 340 high. A good-quality image in the right size is essential!

Please make sure the image you select for your Featured Image is Landscape (horizontal), not Portrait (vertical).

If you choose a portrait-oriented (or square) image for your Featured Image, you’ll find that the template for the site will crop it for you, sometimes with less-than-ideal results. The template will crop the image from the middle, so you’ll lose the top and bottom. This means it might cut off faces or text. Adding text to a photo? Place it in the middle for best results!

Here’s a handy video on how to crop and resize images for the Featured Image:

You can also try this super-simple FREE image resizing tool for your Featured Images! Landscape by Sprout Social will resize your images to optimize them for all the social networks. For the CatholicMom.com featured image, upload your photo to Landscape, choose CUSTOM from the list of social-network options, and place 340 in the box labeled “height” and 720 in the box for “width.” You’ll have the chance to tweak the way your image is cropped before saving it. Images will download as .ZIP files. Simply extract the image file(s) and upload to the site.
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How do I change the size of an image once I’ve added it to my post?

Screenshot resize a photo
Click anywhere in the picture and a little box will appear at the top, with 4 formatting options (left justify, center, right justify, none), then a pencil, then an X. The X will remove the photo from that spot in the post, though it remains in the library. Usually we like to center the photos. When you click on that pencil, you’ll see options to choose the image size.
The sizes you’ll want to use the most are LARGE and MAIN SLIDER.

 

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Why do I need to add images in two places?

We have room for images within posts as well as featured images. Featured images are a must-have. They show on the main CatholicMom.com page and are the only images from your post that will show on the main page.

When your post is opened, the reader will not see that featured image unless you have also added it within the post. It’s perfectly fine to use the same image for your featured image and an image within the post. Just be aware of the size limitations for featured images.

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How do I design an image in Canva that’s the perfect size for the Featured Image?

Canva.com is free to use and allows you to select the exact size of the image you’d like to design. Once you log in, on the right hand side there is an option to “USE CUSTOM DIMENSIONS.” Type in 720 x 340 and then design right from there: pick a background, popp in the picture you want to use and then used the “add text” to put the actual blog title on the image, plus the catholicmom.com logo (if you choose to add that). Then save it and upload it to your post. As always, include photo attribution. If everything is yours, you may simply state:

Copyright (year) (your name). Designed by the author in Canva.

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How do I credit a photo or image that I’ve personally licensed for use?

For photos purchased by author through Shutterstock, Dollar Photo Club, iStock or other paid services: attribution line should read “licensed by author” instead of “used by permission.” Also make sure that information is included in the photo caption so the info stays with the photo in the media library.

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How do I work around an error message when I’m uploading photos?

The site will display an error message if the pictures are too large. Try to keep the dimensions under 2500 pixels in either direction to solve that problem. Resize photos using a free photo editor such as picmonkey.com and rename them before uploading again for best results. We’ve had technical difficulties with photos resized in iPhoto, so if you run into problems, edit your photo using a different program.
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Can I add other images into my post besides the featured image?

Definitely yes! If you wish, you may include your featured image within the post. You can also use photos in different sizes/shapes for inside the article itself. Square or tall photos there are fine (between 800 and 2500 wide, please!) But the featured image must be wide and fit in that space (720×340).
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How do I add a YouTube video to my post?

When you are on the page for the YouTube video you want to share, click the SHARE button that’s a little below the video itself.
A box will pop up underneath that, with a whole bunch of social-media icons and a link below the icons.
Here’s what the YouTube screen will look like after you click that SHARE button:

Screenshot YouTube link howto

Copy the link, then paste it into the post on a blank line.
The link will change into a box for the video to play.
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Copyright Information:

copyright